Wills and Trusts

Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs, LLP

Fiduciary Fees and the 2% floor on Miscellaneous Itemized Deductions

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New Proposed Regulations and Withdrawal of Old Proposed Regulations.

To what extent are fiduciary fees subject to the 2% floor on miscellaneous itemized deductions.  This fascinating question began to be addressed by the various Federal Courts of Appeal in the 1990s.  The U.S. Supreme Court weighed in with Michael J. Knight, Trustee of the William L. Rudkin Testamentary Trust v. Commissioner, 552 U.S. 181, 128 S. Ct. 782 (2008), holding that fees paid to an investment advisor by a nongrantor trust or estate generally are subject to the 2-percent floor for miscellaneous itemized deductions under section 67(a). The Court reached this decision on a reading of section 67(e) that differed from that in the proposed regulations. The Court held that the proper reading of the language in section 67(e), which asks whether the expense ‘‘would not have been incurred if the property were not held in such trust or estate,’’ requires an inquiry into whether a hypothetical individual who held the same property outside of a trust ‘‘customarily’’ or ‘‘commonly’’ would incur such expenses. Expenses that are ‘‘customarily’’ or ‘‘commonly’’ incurred by individuals are subject to the 2- percent floor.

That approach differed from the 2007 Proposed Regulations that adopted a “unique” test:

If a cost is not unique to an estate or trust, such that an individual could have incurred the expense, then that cost is subject to the 2-percent floor.

New Proposed Regulations have been issued (REG-128224-06).  The Background portion of the Supplementary Information summarizes the new proposal:

These proposed regulations reflect the reasoning and holding in Knight and provide guidance relating to the limited portion of the cost of investment advice that is not subject to the 2-percent floor.  To the extent that a portion (if any) of an investment advisory fee exceeds the fee generally charged to an individual investor, and that excess is attributable to an unusual investment objective of the trust or estate or to a specialized balancing of the interests of various parties such that a reasonable comparison with individual investors would be improper, that excess is not subject to the 2-percent floor. Thus, where the costs charged to the trust do not exceed the costs charged to an individual investor, the cost attributable to taking into account the varying interests of current beneficiaries and remaindermen is included in the usual investment advisory fees and is not the type of cost that is excluded from the 2-percent floor under this narrow exception. Individual investors commonly have investment objectives that may require a balance between investing for income and investing for growth and/or a specialized approach for particular assets.

* * *

Specifically, the proposed regulations provide that the portion of a bundled fee attributable to investment advice (including any related services that would be provided to any individual investor as part of the investment advisory fee) will be subject to the 2-percent floor. In addition, the proposed regulations provide that, except for the portion so allocated to investment advice, a fiduciary fee not computed on an hourly basis is fully deductible with certain exceptions. The exceptions are payments made to third parties out of the bundled fee that would have been subject to the 2-percent floor if they had been paid directly by the non-grantor trust or estate, and any payments for expenses separately assessed (in addition to the usual or basic fiduciary fee or commission) by the fiduciary or other service provider that are commonly or customarily incurred by an individual owner of such property.  An example of such a separately assessed expense subject to the 2-percent floor might be an additional fee charged by the fiduciary for managing rental real estate owned by the nongrantor trust or estate.

The proposed regulations allow the fiduciary and/or return preparer to use any reasonable method to make these allocations. However, the amount of each payment (if any) out of the fiduciary’s fee or commission to a third party for expenses subject to the 2-percent floor, and of each separately assessed expense that is commonly or customarily incurred by an individual owner of such property, is readily identifiable without any discretion on the part of the fiduciary. Therefore, the reasonable method standard does not apply to these amounts that are to be deducted from the portion of the bundled fiduciary fee that is not subject to the 2-percent floor.

Section 1.67-4(b)(4) specifically provides that balancing between income and remainder beneficiaries is insufficient:

However, certain incremental costs of investment advice beyond the amount that normally would be charged to an individual investor are not subject to the 2-percent floor. For this purpose, such an incremental cost is a special, additional charge added solely because the investment advice is rendered to a trust or estate instead of to an individual, that is attributable to an unusual investment objective or the need for a specialized balancing of the interests of various parties (beyond the usual balancing of the varying interests of current beneficiaries and remaindermen), in each case such that a reasonable comparison with individual investors would be improper.

The government requests comments on the “types of methods” that could be used to make a reasonable allocation:

Specifically, the IRS and the Treasury Department are interested in methods for reasonably estimating the portion of a bundled fee that is attributable to investment advice. For methods based in whole or in part on time devoted to providing investment advice, the IRS and Treasury Department ask for suggestions for alternatives to contemporaneous time records for specific activities that could be used to substantiate the reasonableness of the allocation.

The effective date will be taxable years after the regulations become final.  No unbundling is required before then.

Turney P. Berry
Louisville, Kentucky

Author: robmalinesq

I am an estate planning and probate attorney in Memphis, Tennessee.

Leave a reply. Please note that although this blog may be helpful in informing clients and others who have an interest in information privacy and security, it is not intended to be legal advice. The information on this blog also should not be relied upon to form an attorney-client relationship.

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